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The Northern Ireland Peace Agreement, also known as the Good Friday Agreement, was a historic moment in the history of Ireland. The agreement was signed on April 10, 1998, and brought an end to decades of conflict and violence between Northern Ireland`s Protestant and Catholic communities.

The peace agreement was the result of intensive negotiations led by the British and Irish governments. It was also supported by the United States government, which played an instrumental role in bringing the parties together.

The Good Friday Agreement was a complex document that addressed many of the underlying issues that had fueled the conflict in Northern Ireland for years. The agreement provided for power-sharing between the Protestant and Catholic communities in Northern Ireland`s government, as well as greater cross-border cooperation between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

The agreement also established bodies to oversee human rights, policing, and justice in Northern Ireland, as well as addressing the issue of decommissioning of weapons held by paramilitary groups.

The peace agreement was hailed as a significant achievement for the people of Northern Ireland and the wider international community. It marked a turning point in the long struggle for peace in Northern Ireland and paved the way for a more stable and prosperous future for all.

In conclusion, the date of the Northern Ireland Peace Agreement, also known as the Good Friday Agreement, was signed on April 10, 1998. This historic agreement brought an end to years of conflict and violence in Northern Ireland and set the stage for a more peaceful and prosperous future for all.